Womans Epic Failure Trying To Prove Magnet Vaccine Conspiracy Goes Viral

A video of a woman trying and failing to demonstrate the conspiracy theory claiming that metal objects stick to the skin due to the COVID-19 vaccine has gone viral, being viewed 3.4 million times on Twitter.

Stock image of a woman receiving a vaccine. A woman tried and failed to prove a vaccine conspiracy theory in a video viewed more than three million times. © MJPS/Getty Stock image of a woman receiving a vaccine. A woman tried and failed to prove a vaccine conspiracy theory in a video viewed more than three million times.

Tyler Buchanan shared the video and said: "Wow. An anti-vaccine nurse in Ohio tried to prove the Vaccines Cause Magnetism theory in a state legislative committee. The demonstration did not go to plan."

In the video, the woman says: "Yes, vaccines do harm people. By the way, so, I just found out something when I was on lunch and I wanted to show it to you.

"You were talking about doctor Tenpenny's testimony about magnetic vaccine crystals, so this is what I found out. So I have a key and a bobby pin here."

Wow. An anti-vaccine nurse in Ohio tried to prove the Vaccines Cause Magnetism theory in an state legislative committee. The demonstration did not go to plan pic.twitter.com/0ubELst4E8

— Tyler Buchanan (@Tylerjoelb) June 9, 2021

She places the key on the bare skin of her chest, which appears to stay still for a few seconds, and says: "Explain to me why the key sticks to me."

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The woman then says, "It sticks to my neck, too," but when she tries sticking it on her neck, the key keeps falling. She then picks up the bobby pin and tries to do the same, but the bobby pin does not stick to her neck either.

She says: "Yeah, so, if someone can explain this, that would be great."

She points to the bobby pin which seems to momentarily balance against her neck before falling. The woman then asks if the audience has any questions.

According to Buchanan, who shared the video, the woman's experiment followed a statement from noted COVID-19 conspiracy theorist Sherri Tenpenny, who claimed that metal in the vaccine is causing forks to stick to people's heads.

In the video, which has been viewed more than five million times on Twitter, Tenpenny says: "Right now we're all hypothesizing. What is it that's actually being transmitted that's causing all of these things? Is it a combination of the protein which now we're finding has a metal attached to it?

Testimony going off the rails now.

Tenpenny is claiming there is metal in the vaccine that causes forks to stick to your forehead. She saw videos of it on the internet, you see

Also promoting the 5G cell phone network vaccine theory. This is the anti-vaccine "expert witness" pic.twitter.com/sPpuAqmHba

— Tyler Buchanan (@Tylerjoelb) June 8, 2021
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"I'm sure you've seen the pictures all over the internet of people who've had these shots and now they're magnetized. You can put a key on their forehead, it sticks. You can put spoons and forks all over them and they can stick because now we think that there's a metal piece to that."

Tenpenny goes on to say: "There's been people who've long suspected that there's some sort of an interface, that has yet to be defined, in the interface that's being injected in the shots and all of the 5G towers. Not proven yet, but we're trying to figure out what is it that's being transmitted to these unvaccinated people."

The conspiracy theory that metal objects stick to the skin of people who have had the COVID-19 vaccine has been circulating recently.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) addressed the theory under its "Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines" page and said: "Receiving a COVID-19 vaccine will not make you magnetic, including at the site of vaccination which is usually your arm.

"COVID-19 vaccines do not contain ingredients that can produce an electromagnetic field at the site of your injection. All COVID-19 vaccines are free from metals such as iron, nickel, cobalt, lithium, and rare earth alloys, as well as any manufactured products such as microelectronics, electrodes, carbon nanotubes, and nanowire semiconductors.

"In addition, the typical dose for a COVID-19 vaccine is less than a milliliter, which is not enough to allow magnets to be attracted to your vaccination site even if the vaccine was filled with a magnetic metal."

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Source : https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/womans-epic-failure-trying-to-prove-magnet-vaccine-conspiracy-goes-viral/ar-AAKUag1

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