Lego Legacy Hack

There’s been a lot of fuss over Apple’s move to ditch the traditional audio jack. As for me, I hope I never have to plug in another headphone cable. This may come off as gleeful dancing on the gravesite of my enemy before the hole has even been dug; it kind of is. The jack has always been a pain point in my devices. Maybe I’ve just been unlucky. Money was tight growing up. I would save up for a nice set of headphones or an mp3 player only to have the jack go out. It was a clear betrayal and ever since I’ve regarded them with suspicion. Is this the best we could do?

I can’t think of a single good reason not to immediately start dumping the headphone jack. Sure it’s one of the few global standards. Sure it’s simple, but I’m willing to take bets that very few people will miss the era of the 3.5mm audio jack once it’s over. It’s a global episode of the sunk cost fallacy.

In the usual way hindsight is 20/20, the 3.5mm audio jack can be looked at as a workaround, a stop over until we didn’t need it.  It appears to be an historic kludge of hack upon hack until something better comes along. When was the last time it was common to hook an Ethernet cable into a laptop? Who would do this when we can get all the bandwidth we want reliably over a wireless connection. Plus, it’s not like most Ethernet cables even meet a spec well enough to meet the speeds they promise. How could anyone reasonably expect the infinitely more subjective and variable headphone and amplifier set to do better?

But rather than just idly trash it, I’d like to make a case against it and paint a possible painless and aurally better future.

Ingress

Let’s say you had to design a consumer facing device that goes in someone’s pocket. A pocket is dusty. It’s moist and sweaty. You know your stuff so you’re already thinking about gaskets and IP ratings. Then someone hands you the spec sheet. They let you know that they want you to drill a hole right in it and put an unserviceable deep hole in the case. Now rinse repeat for every portable device on the planet and it seems like an odd mass hallucination.

img data-attachment-id="226791" data-permalink="https://hackaday.com/2016/10/25/death-to-the-3-5mm-audio-jack-long-live-wireless/jt_switchboard_770x540/" data-orig-file="https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/jt_switchboard_770x540.jpg" data-orig-size="766,531" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"0"}' data-image-title="jt_switchboard_770x540" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="I guess if someone were having a really bad day they could spill coffee at the swtichboard... [CC Joe]
I guess if someone were having a really bad day they could spill coffee at the switchboard… [CC Joseph C.]
There is no good way to seal or maintain a 3.5mm headphone jack. Some phone makers have tried by adding a little gasket or a flap, but this doesn’t last. There’s also a chance that it could be sealed off, but since it has to have little springs inside and holders it’s still susceptible to damage from liquids and dust by nature. I’ve even seen some get irreparably corroded by the salt from sweat alone.

It’s like we all agreed to ignore the fact that these connectors were designed to be used in a switch board. A nice clean dry switchboard in a professional location where it would be used by trained personnel and serviced regularly. It was designed to be an easy to use connector that could be plugged in and removed quickly for low-quality audio phone switching. It was never designed to be the end-all connector for quality audio signals. Moving it out into the world could arguably have just been a quick hack. Using a connector that was already adopted and manufactured on a large enough scale when home audio began to be a common thing.

Since we’ve already gotten rid of the keyboards on mobile devices (which is a shame, but that’s another article). Since every manufacturer seems to be horribly committed to irreplaceable batteries. There’s just no reason not to move towards fully waterproof and dustproof devices. There could at least be a bright side. The audio port is holding us back.

Cable Strain

img data-attachment-id="226893" data-permalink="https://hackaday.com/2016/10/25/death-to-the-3-5mm-audio-jack-long-live-wireless/5649071246_f4cb33b121_o/" data-orig-file="https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/5649071246_f4cb33b121_o.jpg" data-orig-size="5184,3456" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"5.6","credit":"","camera":"Canon EOS 550D","caption":"","created_timestamp":"1303561840","copyright":"","focal_length":"49","iso":"1000","shutter_speed":"0.076923076923077","title":"","orientation":"1"}' data-image-title="5649071246_f4cb33b121_o" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="A story as old as time, which incidently is about as old as the headphone jack.
It’s not the cord’s fault. It was sent to the frontlines without the right equipment.  [CC Paul Hussey]
Next comes cable strain. People like to complain about how the iPhone earbuds would constantly break at the joint. This is true, and other brands had better strain relief. However, it’s also true that all audio cables that go into a pocket will break before any of the other components will reach their end of service life. By nature, a pocket exceeds every reasonable expectation of in-tolerance cable strain. It is a hostile environment. My last set of headphones went through two cables during regular use. Which segues right into the next design flaw, force.

Force

As mentioned before, the audio connector was designed to be easily inserted inside a switch board room. It would see no dramatic force on it. So it’s a tall connector that is easy to hold and easy to use. It also is supposed to be a low insertion force connector. So it’s unreasonable to expect it to be able to hold a cable in place reliably.

However, when put into a pocket it suddenly sees forces perpendicular to its axis. This can cause some extremely large moments on a very tiny plastic and spring-metal socket. We all know that the longer we own our phones the less able our headphone socket will be to hold the jack in place. There’s simply no way to design something that small to take that much force and keep it cost effective. Rather it looks like we’ve just adjusted our expectations and then forgot that we even made that adjustment.

This seems even more insane from a design perspective when you consider that this connector which sees dramatic forces is actually attached to the mainboard of your device (to be fair, most smartphones do use spring connectors for jack to mainboard but think about laptops and other gear). Solder connections are not flexible. The metals we use for solder are very susceptible to work hardening and breaking under cyclical forces. So not only do you flex the connection of the port to the board itself, you also flex all the surrounding components. So It’s no mystery that one of the most common repairs on mobile devices are the audio and USB ports.

Sound Quality

img data-attachment-id="226895" data-permalink="https://hackaday.com/2016/10/25/death-to-the-3-5mm-audio-jack-long-live-wireless/2016-10-12_12h26_12/" data-orig-file="https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/2016-10-12_12h26_12.png" data-orig-size="875,749" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"0"}' data-image-title="2016-10-12_12h26_12" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="Bluetooth's latest codec actually does better than 320kbps mp3.
Bluetooth’s codecs perform comparably 320kbps mp3. Which is beyond the ability of most listeners (including the author) to distinguish. From Serene Audio.

Right now there is still a difference in sound quality between Bluetooth and wired. There’s no reason to expect it to last long. Bluetooth is now capable of some seriously impressive bandwidth and with an actual market erupting for the headsets, it won’t be long before this is a moot point. I’m picking on Bluetooth specifically because it’s the only standard that’s both universal and intended, at least, for hooking peripherals up.

There’s a big argument for the sound quality aspect of the 3.5mm headphone jack. I think that, frankly, most of them make no sense against the transition. If you’re sitting still in your home-listening-chamber with a perfectly tuned preamplifier connected to quality headphones while listening to FLAC audio from your dedicated music computer you might be able to hear a perceptible difference from hooking directly to your phone with a Bluetooth headset. But you’re not. You have a noisy connection from a worn out port to a low quality cable with an unamplified signal to some cost engineered headphones. It’s a wash I think.

Plus, it’s not like switching to a wireless standard is going to absolutely kill the wired headphone market. You’ll still be able to get wired headphones for when the wire matters. People who are paying a hundred dollars plus for quality sound out of a wired headset will still have their toys. That market is very far from death. People who were paying ten bucks for whatever are not going to notice at all.

Most phones and portable devices waste zero energy trying to amplify the signal in a meaningful way. So if you want the full range of your headphones you have to add an amplifier. Then there’s the fact that they’re already class D audio amps trying to maximize the device’s battery life. By the time it gets to your ear it’s been triple digitized to death. Fortunately, we now have more processing power inside greeting cards than we reasonably know what to do with, so it’s unlikely that most would notice the difference.

However, the modern Bluetooth audio chips are actually really great, they’re only getting better. They’re ultra-low power class D amplifiers which were built and optimized for sound quality. With a lithium battery right there inside the headphone there’s no reason not to expect engineers to take advantage of that and stop designing every driver in the world to run off the two or three magic pixies a cell phone is willing to give it. It should actually be possible to have significantly better sounding wireless headphones than wired.

Convenience and User Experience

img data-attachment-id="226789" data-permalink="https://hackaday.com/2016/10/25/death-to-the-3-5mm-audio-jack-long-live-wireless/do-you-know-how-to-make-these-knots-your-pocket-does/" data-orig-file="https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/do-you-know-how-to-make-these-knots-your-pocket-does.jpg" data-orig-size="530,759" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"0","credit":"","camera":"","caption":"","created_timestamp":"0","copyright":"","focal_length":"0","iso":"0","shutter_speed":"0","title":"","orientation":"0"}' data-image-title="do-you-know-how-to-make-these-knots-your-pocket-does" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="" data-medium-file="https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/do-you-know-how-to-make-these-knots-your-pocket-does.jpg?w=279" data-large-file="https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/do-you-know-how-to-make-these-knots-your-pocket-does.jpg?w=436" loading="lazy" src="https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/do-you-know-how-to-make-these-knots-your-pocket-does.jpg?w=279" alt="It's a cultural joke at this point." width="279" height="400" srcset="https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/do-you-know-how-to-make-these-knots-your-pocket-does.jpg 530w, https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/do-you-know-how-to-make-these-knots-your-pocket-does.jpg?resize=175,250 175w, https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/do-you-know-how-to-make-these-knots-your-pocket-does.jpg?resize=279,400 279w, https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/do-you-know-how-to-make-these-knots-your-pocket-does.jpg?resize=436,625 436w" sizes="(max-width: 279px) 100vw, 279px"">It's a cultural joke at this point.It’s a cross-cultural joke at this point.

I bought a very cheap set of Bluetooth headphones off Amazon. I have rarely been so pleased with a purchase. Did they sound good? Not really, but I don’t expect any ten dollar headset to sound good. What I did get was an average of ten days of on and off use before the battery needed charging. I could go to the climbing gym and leave my cellphone on the ground while I climbed. When I worked on projects in the hackerspace I could walk up to thirty feet from my phone and not miss a word of my audio book. It connected automatically. It played nice. It was a better experience in every way.

With my headphones I’m always fighting with the cable. I’m always arranging my phone in my pocket so the cord isn’t flexed too much. It’s a cultural meme that headphones know more knots than we do.

Sure there are some flaws of the Bluetooth. Will we cover battery replacement hacks in a few years? Probably. Will there be growing pains? Of course. Will they be ironed out in the next few years? Most likely.

Transition:

So how do we transition? Well, the first step is done. Have a big player finally give up on the port. It’s time. But what about all the things that are nice about corded headphones? The global standard? The fact that you can contribute to the complete devastation of our planet by buying them cheaply by the pound instead of being a grown adult who can hold on and take care of a quality item? How about their universal integration with every device that wants to put a sound out?

img data-attachment-id="226894" data-permalink="https://hackaday.com/2016/10/25/death-to-the-3-5mm-audio-jack-long-live-wireless/17182400279_0b0da5cdbc_o/" data-orig-file="https://hackaday.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/17182400279_0b0da5cdbc_o.jpg" data-orig-size="5184,3456" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta='{"aperture":"2.8","credit":"","camera":"Canon EOS Kiss X6i","caption":"","created_timestamp":"1430739066","copyright":"","focal_length":"40","iso":"125","shutter_speed":"0.0125","title":"","orientation":"1"}' data-image-title="17182400279_0b0da5cdbc_o" data-image-description="" data-image-caption="It's not like we don't have other really nice global standards that could power a headphone set. [CC
It’s not like we don’t have other really nice global standards that could power a headphone set. [CC Maurizio Pesce]
But we do have other global standards that can transmit sound signals. We have USB. While I hedge to give Apple too much credit after they threw their lot in with Beats, in this regard they are also showing the way. A dongle is an inelegant example, however, only as a transition out of the 3.5mm port. What if your headphones just had a USB C port on one end and you could plug the cable of choice right into your mobile. The phone has the ability to power some accessories and as long as it’s designed to switch off the charging circuit while it’s at it, there’s no reason it won’t work. We can all transition painlessly. We really won’t miss it.

Laptops could definitely simultaneously charge and play. If your battery is running low, just hook it up to USB. You get the cord experience and the universal standard experience we’ve all come to love. Just without a weird analog connector from the birth of electronics. All the LEGO pieces are there, we just need to build the spaceship.

All that is pedantic though. Portable audio has never been a power-hungry game and in the end I just don’t think people will notice the cable woes. I thought I would and I don’t. I’m already so used to plugging things in when the situation requires that I just do it and that’s that.

It’s time for the 3.5mm legacy to go. I hope others follow Apple’s lead. I hope all the major headphone makers turn their eyes to wireless audio and the possibilities it offers. There are already quality sets out there and it will only get better. I won’t miss it. I don’t miss magnetic hard drives. I don’t miss CDs and Mini Disks. I haven’t tuned the bunny ears on a television in at least a decade. I don’t even own an Ethernet cable nor have I used a DB9 serial cable for hardware development in years. The future moves on and this time I think it will show itself to move in exactly the right direction.

Source : https://hackaday.com/2016/10/25/death-to-the-3-5mm-audio-jack-long-live-wireless/

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